Walking holidays can introduce you to a whole new world

These days we spent so much time going from A to B at a rate of knots, either in a car or on board a train, maybe even an airplane. We make and take journey after journey, yet how often do we get the chance to look at what is passing by us each and every time. While the purpose of a journey from A to B is simply to reach point B how often do we forget to have a closer look at what lies between.

What are UK walking holiday might not be at the top of the list of everybody’s dream holiday, you would be surprised at what you discover when you take the time to look around you and see many of the beautiful sites in this wonderful country. With the pace of life we all live and work at these days, sometimes it is difficult not just to stand still, but to learn to stand still. The beauty of a walking holiday, and especially a walking weekend is that even though it will involve getting from point A to point B, you will have time to stop and take in the view, smell the air, feel the wind in your hair and generally feel more at one with the earth.

There is a lovely article in The Guardian newspaper written by Hope Whitmore who talks about the fact that he has spent most of her life in or near the hills. Not only does she have a beautifully descriptive time, but the way she talks about walking in the hills is most enticing. In particular, she talks about living in the Pentland Hills just outside Edinburgh.

Such a comment makes you want to put on your walking boots and head out yourself. Walking trips in the UK don’t have to be day-long tracks and weekend walking holidays needn’t involve trying to cross from east to west coast in one go. Here at Celtic trails we have a number of walking holidays on our books that we know would be the perfect introduction for you to a weekend away from it all, so why not give us a call and let us tell you more about them?

“One evening recently, keen to get out of the house after a full day of writing, I set off into the hills which slope up from my house, reaching the peak of one at perhaps half ten. Turning I saw the lights of Edinburgh glittering at me, like a sparkling shawl which had been thrown at my feet. I felt so distant to it but so near, as though I for that moment had possession of the city below my feet, and all who inhabited it. These solitary evening walks are healing, a cleansing of the soul, drawing a line between the workaday world and the night time, the land of stories, relaxation and sleep.”